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AK 47 Full Auto: Easy, Affordable, How-To Guide

AK 47 Full auto

The AK 47 is a selective rifle that can be used as a semi-automatic and full automatic. It is also known as the Kalashnikov rifle, which is one of the most popular rifles. Most people know it as the AK 47. It is an easy-to-use rifle for everyone.

Before understanding how to make the AK 47, you should catch two points.

First of all, you need to have a proper license when you are going to use rifles. In most civilized countries, they have various regulations about using handguns and rifles.

Therefore, you should ensure these laws in your regions. Secondly, you need to set full auto parts and create a full automatic bolt carrier.

When you have a license, you can find full auto parts. Because there are many kinds of AK 47, this article focused on 7.62 x 39. Most of the clones of AK are interchangeable (except the Galil.308 and the Galil.203)

If you want to have the exact auto part, you would buy one metal template and make a hole in the set. You can begin to install the auto part then.

It is not difficult to set up this auto part. Firstly, you make the hole (with 7mm) on the left side of the receiver.

On the right side, you make a 5mm hole. It would be best if you separated the receiver because of the security of the template on the left side.

To do this, you move the axis pins in the holes marked in 3 and 4. Then, you mark the spot in number 2 by using a scribe to make a circle.

Secondly, you replace the slave pins and the template. You move the template to the opposite side of the receiver. Do not forget to scribe the two holes and punch at the center.

Thirdly, you drill the left side of the receiver with the larger of the two bits. Then, you take and move the template carefully on a table.

Then, you concentrate on the slotting of the bolt carrier guide rail of the receiver wall. If you look down your separated AK and you have the muzzle on the left side, you will see the template.

As you can see in the picture, the dark area is where you will remove metal from the bolt carrier guide rail.

You need to do this task for the trip arm of the automatic sear. It will project above the rail and engage a cam on the bolt carrier.

It produces the automatic fire when the selector level is moved in the middle position. It would help if you slotted it instead of cutting it because it is neater.

You drill a series of 1/16” holes near the receiver wall. You can cut the web between them and using a Swiss file.

Your rifle could have a restrictor on the right side of the receiver. It depends on the manufacturer.

This is not a useful piece of folded metal above the magazine to prevent the selector in the lowest position. It could be cut, and the selector lever can pass behind this point in the picture.

Then, you change the restrictor device. You may make a detent for the selector lever to move into it. You can make it with a light mill cut.

Do not cut through the receiver wall. It could be made with a light ¼” drill. Remember to block inside the receiver by wood backing or use an aluminum hit.

The detent is located under the existing detent at the height of the axis hole of number 2 (you can see in the picture).

If you do not have a full automatic bolt carrier, you can make or buy it. There is a difference between the semi-automatic carrier and the full-automatic version.

The difference is a semi-automatic rifle does not have the sear trip cam. It is a small projecting surface, as you can see above.

The illustration describes a dimension of the cam which a welder could build up on the semi-automatic cam. And a machinist can mill it to the measurements.

If you can’t access a machine shop, you buy a full – automatic carrier. Before buying one, you should take a look at the following list:

  • 223 rifles have a semi-automatic carrier
  • 308 rifles could not be converted using the AK 47 full – automatic and replacing sets of the part.
  • Most of the Valmet rifles have a full – automatic carrier
  • MAADI rifles have a full – automatic carrier
  • Yugoslav rifles have a semi-auto bolt carrier
  • Hungarians have a full – automatic carrier
  • Chinese rifles have a semi-auto carrier
  • South – African rifles have a full – automatic carrier

After reading these above lists, are you ready for separation? You install the automatic sear and the sear spring in the receiver by inserting the axis pin in these parts.

Then, you use the famous AK 47 slave pin to gather the trigger, disconnector spring, and you put this part into the receiver. You also raise the automatic sear spring above the trigger axis hole and enter the trigger axis pin.

This process will remove the AK47 slave pin. After that, you collect the full-auto hammer, the hammer spring and put them into the receiver. 

On the one hand, you need to use a screwdriver to depress the automatic sear spring below the hammer axis pin’s hole. Moreover, you need to enter the hammer axis pin, hook the tail end to make loops of the hammer spring over each trigger’s side.

While hearing, you may wish to have three heads and six hands to do this job. It is not tricky as you may think.

When you have entirely assembled the full automatic lower part of the receiver, the automatic sear spring contains all of the axis pins in the receiver.

After making these parts, you could have a select-fire rifle. The selector is moved in the upper position. You could realize that the rifle is safe.

When it is placed in the lower part, this is semi-automatic. And when the selector moved in the middle position, you will have the full – automatic AK 47 rifle.

The AK 47 is not expensive in the gun market. The AK 47 and its parts are made in several countries. It is designed as a simple, available, and easy weapon.

Furthermore, it is so hard to break. The manufactures are going to produce these rifles without impediment.

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About the author

Christopher Wade

Christopher Wade is a true outdoorsman. After spending most of his career as a firearms expert and instructor in Nebraska, he retreated to the great outdoors to enjoy retirement.

Christopher’s expertise in handling firearms and hunting gear are what propelled him to create the Shooting Mystery blog. He hopes for all readers to gain useful and practical knowledge for enjoying their time outdoors.